Myths vs. Facts

Myths vs. Facts

Myth vs Fact #1

Myth #1

The Common Core State Standards were developed by the federal government.

Fact #1

These new standards were not Washington’s idea and the federal government was not involved in their development.

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Myth #2

The Common Core State Standards are owned by private entities which cannot be influenced by the public.

Fact #2

The Common Core State Standards are owned by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers. These groups are both made up of state officials who are accountable to the public.

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Myth #3

Private schools, religious schools, and homeschooling will be required to follow the Common Core State Standards.

Fact #3

As they have in the past, private, faith-based, and home schools will continue to have flexibility on how and what they teach, as long as it comports with state guidelines.

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Myth #6

The federal government will take over ownership of the Common Core State Standards Initiative.

Fact #6

The federal government will not govern the Common Core State Standards Initiative. The Initiative was and will remain a state-led effort. The National Governors Association and Council of Chief State School Officers are committed to developing a long-term governance structure with leadership from governors, chief state school officers, and other state policymakers.

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Myth vs Fact #5

Myth #5

The Common Core State Standards are not internationally benchmarked.

Fact #5

International benchmarking played a significant role in both sets of standards. In fact, the college- and career-ready standards include an appendix listing the evidence that was consulted in drafting the standards and the international data consulted in the benchmarking process.

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Myth vs Fact #4

Myth #4

There was only one math content expert involved in reviewing the Common Core State Standards, and he withheld his approval for the standards.

Fact #4

There were eight experts on the Common Core Validation Committee, and six endorsed the standards. There were more than 70 experts on the development team for the math standards.

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Myth vs Fact #7

Myth #7

Many states only adopted the Common Core State Standards to qualify for new grants being offered by the federal government.

Fact #7

States across the country adopted the Common Core State Standards because they recognized the clear need to improve their education systems and better prepare America’s students for college. Besides, the adoption of the Common Core State Standards played only a minor role in the government’s decision-making as it granted allocations to various states across the country. Twenty-three states who adopted the Common Core State Standards were not awarded grants, and a state’s decision to adopt the Common Core State Standards made up just 8% of its score under the federal application for education grants.

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Myth #8

The Common Core State Standards dictate the process for evaluating teachers.

Fact #8

Only states decide how to evaluate teachers, principals, and other educators.

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Myth #9

Teachers were not involved in writing the Common Core State Standards.

Fact #9

The drafting process relied on teachers from across the country. In addition, there were many state experts that came together to create the most thoughtful and transparent process of standard setting. This was only made possible by many states working together.

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Myth #10

The Common Core State Standards are a national curriculum.

Fact #10

The Common Core only create foundational standards in the subjects of math and English language arts. The standards determine what basics a student needs to learn, not how. Curriculum—how students will be taught to these standards—is within the complete control of districts, local school boards, and teachers.

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Myth #11

The Common Core State Standards tell teachers what to teach.

Fact #11

The best understanding of what works in the classroom comes from the teachers who are in them. That’s why these standards will establish what students need to learn, but they will not dictate how teachers should teach. Instead, schools and teachers decide how best to help students reach the standards.

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Myth vs Fact #12

Myth #12

The Common Core State Standards don’t have enough emphasis on fiction/literature.

Fact #12

The standards require certain critical content for all students, including classic myths and stories from around the world; America’s founding documents, foundational American literature, and Shakespeare. Appropriately, the remaining crucial decisions about what content should be taught are left to state and local determination

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Myth #13

The Common Core State Standards are not research or evidence based.

Fact #13

The standards have made careful use of a large and growing body of evidence. The evidence base includes scholarly research; surveys on what skills are required of students entering college and workforce training programs; assessment data identifying college‐ and career‐ready performance; and comparisons to standards from high‐performing states and nations.

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Myth #14

The Common Core State Standards expose students’ private data to the federal government.

Fact #14

Data collection is at the state-level, based on laws having nothing to do with the Common Core. Implementation of the Common Core State Standards does not change current practices.

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Myth #15

The Common Core State Standards do little more than prepare students for entry-level and low-level jobs.

Fact #15

Current high school graduates have been told they were on track for college level work. Yet according to a 2011 ACT study, just one in four American students who graduate high school are ready for college. Only 52% of graduates were prepared for college level reading courses, 45% were ready for college level math courses. In fact, only about half of students entering college finish any degree within 6 years. Common Core’s higher standards will help ensure students are better prepared to succeed in college, and in turn, better prepared for the workforce upon graduating college.

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Myth #16

The presence of the Common Core State Standards will result in less innovation in state and local curricula.

Fact #16

Because the standards are more focused than previous state standards, teachers and localities actually have more flexibility to be creative and responsive to community priorities and individual students.

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Stay informed on education standards in your state.

Stay informed on education standards in your state.

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Copyright © 2015

US Chamber of Commerce Foundation

All Rights Reserved

Copyright © 2015

US Chamber of Commerce Foundation

All Rights Reserved